Dismal rule of law in the Philippines


It’s confirmed. The Philippines does not adhere to the rule of law.

In the annual Rule of Law Index for 2014, the Philippines received dismal grades for its adherence to the rule of law. In fact, the country was a dismal failure, receiving an average score of only .5 out of 1. That’s a failing grade of 50 percent.

In the region, we ranked 11th out of 15 states, behind even Mongolia, and in the company of Vietnam, China, Myanmar and Cambodia. We were eighth out of 24 in our income rank of lower middle-income countries. Worldwide, we were in the bottom half of the world ranking 60th out of 99 countries included in the survey.

The annual Rule of Law Index is a project of the World Justice Project. While the “rule of law “ is difficult to define, the project nonetheless evaluates countries’ adherence to the rule of law through outcomes that the rule of law brings to society. This includes “ accountability, respect for fundamental rights, and access to justice”.

The annual survey is based on four universal principles on the rule of law: one, government and its officials and agents are accountable under the rule of law; two, the laws are clear, publicized, stable and just, applied evenly, and protect fundamental rights including security of persons and property; three, the process by which the laws are enacted, administered and enforced is accessible, fair and just; and four, justice is delivered by competent, ethical, independent representatives who are of sufficient numbers, have adequate resources, and reflect the make-up of communities they serve.

The rule of law project then conducted a survey on 99 countries asking respondents to comment on eight factor areas of the rule of law, to wit: constraints on government power, or the extent to which those who govern are bound by the rule of law where the Philippines received a score of 59 percent. Absence of corruption where the Philippines received a score of 50 percent%, open government where the country got a lower score of 45percent, fundamental rights with a score of 52 percent, order and security with a score of 73 percent, regulatory enforcement with a score of 46 percent, civil justice with a score of 40 percent and the lowest, criminal justice with a depressing score of 36 percent.

While the methodology of the project was through a survey of at least 300 local experts in each country jurisdiction, the findings correspond with the reality on the ground. For instance, the country’s lowest score in criminal justice jibes with the fact that almost no person has been held accountable for extralegal killings in this country. The index bolsters the Asia Foundation-funded Parreño report that showed that the country has a dismal 1 percent conviction rate for extralegal killings. The score on civil justice also corresponds with the grim reality that civil cases take forever to be resolved in our courts. Likewise, the failing grades on corruption, open governance and fundamental rights appear to be reflective of realties, what with PDAF and the DAP scandals.

The surprise is the 73 percent, which we received in the area of order and security. With the recent spate of criminal activities, including kidnappings again prevalent, I am surprised that respondents still gave our country a nearly passing grade for this category.

In its report on the Philippines, the Rule of Law Index noted favorably “the existence of a vibrant civil society and a free media” which has been “reasonably effective checks on government power”. It noted though that “civil conflict and political violence remain problematic”. It also reported that “the country also has challenges with respect to protection of fundamental rights (ranking 67th over-all), particularly in regard to violations against the right to life and security of the person, police abuses, due process violations, and harsh correctional facilities”. It also highlighted that the “civil courts system ranks poorly (82/99 globally and 12/15 regionally) due to deficient enforcement mechanisms and the lengthy duration of cases”.

Beyond the index, the report confirms that we have a barely working rule of law in this country. This means that our public officers are not held accountable for their acts; our laws are unevenly applied, depending on whether one is rich or poor or politically connected or otherwise, think of NAIA Terminal 3 which is now being used without the builder being paid for the building; laws are not effectively enforced, and justice is not delivered by competent judges with sufficient numbers and competence.

In other words, we have a failed legal system where we are one notch away from reverting to the laws of the jungle.

This is yet another reason why a lawyer like Jojo Binay should be in Malacañang come 2016.

This post first appeared in http://manilastandardtoday.com/2014/09/11/dismal-rule-of-law-in-the-philippines/ on September 11, 2014.

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One comment on “Dismal rule of law in the Philippines

  1. Romulo A. Cator says:

    It does not necessarily mean that because Vice President Jejomar Binay is a lawyer that he deserves to be president of the Philippines. He has to prove first and foremost thet he is Maka Diyos, Maka Tao at Makabayan in all sincerity.

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